Review Bee

Review Bee

Truth Hurts by Rebecca Reid

Book cover for Truth Hurts by Rebecca Reid

Truth Hurts

Author:
Publisher:

Published: August 22nd 2019

Format: Kindle

Background

DISCLAIMER: I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

Rebecca Reid is a freelance journalist. Her experience writing for The Telegraph’s Women’s section has lead Reid to write tantalising tales of female relationships from friends to foes. She made her fictional debut last year with her novel Perfect Liars, which I reviewed here.

Review

Poppy and Drew’s lives began anew the day they signed their wedding papers. They’ve only known each other for a short time. Poppy, a nanny for an uptight and formidable family back in the UK is thrown out of her employer’s holiday home. Left with nothing, her decision to drown her sorrows and the last of her cash at a local bar, initially appears to be the best decision she ever could have made. She quickly catches the eye of a fellow Brit, a wealthy (and gorgeous) man, visiting for work and a short holiday.

They begin a whirlwind romance, falling in love, or at least lust, immediately. But Poppy and Drew quickly realise that what they have is more than just a holiday fling. They decide to get married then and there. They’ll arrive back in the UK as a beautiful couple; husband and wife.

In the rush of new love, Drew proposes a somewhat romantic idea—neither of them will tell the other about their past lives. From now on, they will only live in the here and now. There won’t be any uncomfortable discussions about past loves, bad breakups, or unflattering childhood haircuts.

I don’t believe that total transparency is always the way towards happiness.

– Rebecca Reid, Truth Hurts

It all sounds innocuous at first. A fresh start. And, for Poppy, a lifesaver. Because, beneath her girl-next-door demeanour, she has a secret. One that’s very difficult to explain. Poppy knows that there must be a deeper reason for Drew to suggest the arrangement, but the chance to forget her own sins is too good to ignore. Until she begins to wonder if what Drew is hiding is worse than her own secrets.

With Poppy, Reid has proven again that she has a talent for writing flawed and complex women. The thought of being whisked away by a rich man isn’t something I encounter much in my lack of romance novels, but I won’t say it’s an unappealing thought. It seems that Poppy feels this way too. She is constantly concerned with what others might think of her; that she’s a gold-digger, a younger woman wheedling her way into a rich man’s heart through her good looks and “working class” humour.

Throughout the novel, Reid carefully draws out Poppy’s past, leaving the reader guessing, wondering, and waiting, to find out what it is that’s so awful she might jump at the chance to marry a man who won’t even tell her his mother’s name.

I think sometimes you have to give up on the idea that someone is going to change.

Rebecca Reid, Truth Hurts

Truth Hurts is a simple idea turned into a crafty and compelling plot. Reid set the bar high with her debut novel, Perfect Liars, but she manages to pull it off again with this new stand-alone novel. This talented author seems to have carved out a niche with both novels covering similar themes of truth, deception, and the lies that family and friends will tell.

Although not action-packed, the unyielding feeling of something being just not quite right drew me through this read in only two sittings. Reid’s writing permeates the novel with a sense of unease, pulling you through the pages and not letting up until the jaw-dropping finale.

For the reader who likes characters (and mysteries) that are not quite so black-and-white, this is the author to watch. From her twisted first novel to this secretive thriller, Reid’s novels are great fun (and a little scary) to experience.

4.3Overall Score

Truth Hurts

When Drew suggests that he and his wife, Poppy, start their newlywed life by not revealing anything from their past, Poppy jumps at the chance. The opportunity to start a new life free from past ...

  • Plot
    4.0
  • Characters
    4.5
  • Theme
    4.0
  • Structure
    4.5
  • Dialogue
    3.5
  • Pacing
    5.0

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